When WHEN GOOGLE MET WIKILEAKS met our bookshelf. Julian Assange’s new book is out now. Get your copy here. 

When WHEN GOOGLE MET WIKILEAKS met our bookshelf. Julian Assange’s new book is out now. Get your copy here

Patrick Cockburn, author of The Jihadis Return: ISIS and the New Sunni Uprising, discusses the beheading of journalist James Foley and the future of the Islamic State on Truthdig Radio.

Just got Blood Splatters Quickly by Ed Wood back from the proofreader, which means it will be out before you know it. Pre-order your copy now and get 15% off.

Just got Blood Splatters Quickly by Ed Wood back from the proofreader, which means it will be out before you know it. Pre-order your copy now and get 15% off.

Looking for something new to read? Our entire catalog is available on Oyster. 

Looking for something new to read? Our entire catalog is available on Oyster

Julian Assange’s new book, When Google Met WikiLeaks, is now shipping!  

Julian Assange’s new book, When Google Met WikiLeaks, is now shipping!  

Justin modeling some TECHNOCREEP stickers. 

Justin modeling some TECHNOCREEP stickers. 

" Critchley lovingly unearths profoundly deep cuts from every Bowie era in a short sharp book worthy of its subject. Miraculously doubles up as an introduction to philosophy. "
by Gruff Rhys, musician (formerly of Furry Little Animals), and author of American Interior on Simon Critchley’s Bowie. Now available for pre-order at www.orbooks.com.
housingworksbookstore:

We are so thrilled to be working with the very fine folks at orbooks on a new book: Tales of Two Cities: The Best and Worst of Times in Today’s New York. A portion of proceeds from book sales will benefit Housing Works, and we are working on a not-to-be-missed launch event here a the bookstore in October; stay tuned for details!
The book is edited by John Freeman, illustrated by Molly Crabapple, and features and amazing roster of writers: 
GARNETTE CADOGAN, BILL CHENG, TEJU COLE, LYDIA DAVIS, JONATHAN DEE, JUNOT DIAZ, MARK DOTY, DAVE EGGERS, JONATHAN SAFRAN FOER, D.W. GIBSON, CHAASADAHYAH JACKSON, SARAH JAFFE, LAWRENCE JOSEPH, VICTOR LaVALLE, VALERIA LUISELLI, COLUM McCANN, DINAW MENGESTU, TÉA OBREHT, PATRICK RYAN, MICHAEL SALU, ROSIE SCHAAP, TAIYE SELASI, AKHIL SHARMA, ZADIE SMITH, JEANNE THORNTON, HANNAH TINTI, MARIA VENEGAS, and EDMUND WHITE.
More on the book:
Growing inequality is today a world-wide phenomenon. But it is at its most acute in the “world cities” where the rich choose to live (or invest their fortunes in real estate). Nowhere is this more evident than New York City, where the top 1% earns upwards of $500,000/year, while 22,000 children are homeless.
What does this chasm of wealth feel like to people who live and work in NYC? The stories in Tales of Two Cities mix fiction and reportage to convey the indignities and heartbreak, the callousness and solidarities, of living side-by-side with people who have a stupefyingly different income.
In these pages we read of the polarizing effect of a violent attack on the Q train as it crosses the Manhattan Bridge, of the subterranean lives of homeless people who must find a bed in the city’s underground tunnels, and of the rage felt by a millionaire at being stuck in a snowstorm. We hear of the stresses that burgeoning gentrification can bring to neighbors in a Brooklyn apartment block, and of the way destitution in India shapes the perception of poverty in New York for an immigrant from the sub-continent. We walk past the luxury pet spas and yoga studios that have opened next to cheap hair braiding salons and detox clinics in Hamilton Heights, witness the shenanigans of seriously alienated night shift paralegals, and find out what it’s like to be a housing defendant standing up for tenants whose landlords go to shocking lengths to raise rents.
Eschewing more direct sociological or economic analysis, the pieces here focus on the human dimension of penury and profligacy coexisting in the tightest of quarters. In his successful election campaign, Mayor Bill de Blasio referred often to the “tale of two cities” that is life in today’s New York. With writing that will move the reader, not just emotionally but perhaps, too, to action, this anthology gives life to the meaning of those words in the streets and buildings of the metropolis.
A portion of the proceeds from this book will go to Housing Works.

housingworksbookstore:

We are so thrilled to be working with the very fine folks at orbooks on a new book: Tales of Two Cities: The Best and Worst of Times in Today’s New York. A portion of proceeds from book sales will benefit Housing Works, and we are working on a not-to-be-missed launch event here a the bookstore in October; stay tuned for details!

The book is edited by John Freeman, illustrated by Molly Crabapple, and features and amazing roster of writers: 

GARNETTE CADOGAN, BILL CHENG, TEJU COLE, LYDIA DAVIS, JONATHAN DEE, JUNOT DIAZ, MARK DOTY, DAVE EGGERS, JONATHAN SAFRAN FOER, D.W. GIBSON, CHAASADAHYAH JACKSON, SARAH JAFFE, LAWRENCE JOSEPH, VICTOR LaVALLE, VALERIA LUISELLI, COLUM McCANN, DINAW MENGESTU, TÉA OBREHT, PATRICK RYAN, MICHAEL SALU, ROSIE SCHAAP, TAIYE SELASI, AKHIL SHARMA, ZADIE SMITH, JEANNE THORNTON, HANNAH TINTI, MARIA VENEGAS, and EDMUND WHITE.

More on the book:

Growing inequality is today a world-wide phenomenon. But it is at its most acute in the “world cities” where the rich choose to live (or invest their fortunes in real estate). Nowhere is this more evident than New York City, where the top 1% earns upwards of $500,000/year, while 22,000 children are homeless.

What does this chasm of wealth feel like to people who live and work in NYC? The stories in Tales of Two Cities mix fiction and reportage to convey the indignities and heartbreak, the callousness and solidarities, of living side-by-side with people who have a stupefyingly different income.

In these pages we read of the polarizing effect of a violent attack on the Q train as it crosses the Manhattan Bridge, of the subterranean lives of homeless people who must find a bed in the city’s underground tunnels, and of the rage felt by a millionaire at being stuck in a snowstorm. We hear of the stresses that burgeoning gentrification can bring to neighbors in a Brooklyn apartment block, and of the way destitution in India shapes the perception of poverty in New York for an immigrant from the sub-continent. We walk past the luxury pet spas and yoga studios that have opened next to cheap hair braiding salons and detox clinics in Hamilton Heights, witness the shenanigans of seriously alienated night shift paralegals, and find out what it’s like to be a housing defendant standing up for tenants whose landlords go to shocking lengths to raise rents.

Eschewing more direct sociological or economic analysis, the pieces here focus on the human dimension of penury and profligacy coexisting in the tightest of quarters. In his successful election campaign, Mayor Bill de Blasio referred often to the “tale of two cities” that is life in today’s New York. With writing that will move the reader, not just emotionally but perhaps, too, to action, this anthology gives life to the meaning of those words in the streets and buildings of the metropolis.

A portion of the proceeds from this book will go to Housing Works.

Molly Crabapple’s brilliant initial sketch for the TALES OF TWO CITIES cover. She’ll also be illustrating some of the stories in the collection. Stay tuned! 

Molly Crabapple’s brilliant initial sketch for the TALES OF TWO CITIES cover. She’ll also be illustrating some of the stories in the collection. Stay tuned! 

Norman Finkelstein discusses the Gaza ceasefire on Democracy Now!

" There is nothing more political than literature. Reading is the real Revolution. "

Bowie feels like a musical experience (perhaps one with headphones, or in a listening booth, as the nature of silent reading is one of solitude), an experience that Critchley enjoyed composing and producing. It feels like an experience proffered with the intent of both enjoyment and wisdom (like music). There are theories here, but no heavy theses weight down this little pocket-sized book. You can take it into the water, and still float. Critchley rediscovers Bowie as he writes, each song invoked, a Proustian madeleine.”

—from Michaela Mullin’s review of Bowie by Simon Critchley in Nomadic Sojourns Creative Collective. Available now only from OR Books.

via Brainpickings

What is your idea of perfect happiness?
Reading.

What do you consider your greatest achievement?
Discovering morning.

What is your greatest fear?
Converting kilometers to miles.

What historical figure do you most identify with?
Santa Claus.

Which living person do you most admire?
Elvis.

Who are your heroes in real life?
The consumer.

What is the trait you most deplore in others?
Talent.

What is your favorite journey?
The road of artistic excess.

What do you consider the most overrated virtue?
Sympathy and originality.

Which word or phrases do you most overuse?
“Chthonic,” “miasma.”

What is your greatest regret?
That I never wore bellbottoms.

What is your current state of mind?
Pregnant.

What is the quality you most like in a man?
The ability to return books.

What is your motto?
“What” is my motto.

Some choice words from David Bowie – we’d love to see Simon Critchley’s answers. Bowie by Critchley is available now, only from OR Books.